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Oxycodone Screen Drug Test - OxyContin drug testing

What is Oxycodone?

Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic opioid with a structural similarity to codeine.  The drug is manufactured by modifying thebaine, an alkaloid found in the opium poppy. Oxycodone, like all opiate agonists, provides pain relief by acting on opioid receptors in the spinal cord, brain, and possibly directly in the affected tissues.  Oxycodone is prescribed for the relief of moderate to high pain under the well-known pharmaceutical trade names of OxyContin®, Tylox®, Percodan® and Percocet®. While Tylox, Percodan and Percocet contain only small doses of oxycodone hydrochloride combined with other analgesics such as acetaminophen or aspirin, OxyContin consists solely of oxycodone hydrochloride in a time-release form.

Oxycodone is known to metabolize by demethylation into oxymorphone and noroxycodone.  In a 24-hour urine, 33-61% of a single, 5mg oral dose is excreted with the primary constituents being unchanged drug (13-19%), conjugated drug (7-29%) and conjugated oxymorphone (13-14%)1. The window of detection for oxycodone in urine is expected to be similar to that of other opioids such as morphine.

Detailed OxyContin Information

For information on how long drugs stay in your system, see Drug Detection Window.

Home Drug Test Kits

The OXYCODONE One Step Oxycodone Test Device yields a positive result when the oxycodone level in urine exceeds 100 ng/mL.

1 Panel Oxycodone Drug Test Dip
Description

 

The OXYCODONE One Step Oxycodone Test Strip is a lateral flow chromatographic immunoassay for the qualitative detection of oxycodone in human urine at a cut-off concentration of 100 ng/mL.

#DIP-OXY - Oxycodone

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Other Single Panel Drug Test Dips
Description

#DIP-AMP - Amphetamine
#DIP-BAR - Barbiturates
#DIP-BZO - Benzodiazepines
#DIP-COC - Cocaine
#DIP-mAMP - Methamphetamines
#DIP-MDMA - Ecstasy
#DIP-MTD - Methadone
#DIP-OPI - Opiate
#DIP-PCP - Phencyclidine
#DIP-THC - Marijuana

 

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The following table lists compounds that produced positive results on the OXYCODONE One Step Oxycodone Test Strip at a read time of 5 minutes:

Compound Concentration (ng/mL)
   Oxycodone         100    
   Codeine    50,000    
   Dihydrocodeine    12,500    
   Ethylmorphine    25,000    
   Hydrocodone      1,562    
   Hydromorphone    12,500    
   Oxymorphone      1,562    
   Thebaine    50,000    

 

Oxycodone, active ingredient in the pharmaceutical brands Oxycontin®, Percodan® and Percocet®, is an opiod drug that is chemically derived from the opiate codeine. Although the drug has been in existence for decades, the recent awareness of oxycodone as an abused drug and it’s implication in fatal overdoses warrants an immediate need for an accurate, rapid drug screen specifically designed to detect oxycodone. Some relevant statistics include the following:

As of 2001, with sales nearing $1.5 billion, OxyContin® ranked #1 in retail sales of branded controlled pharmaceuticals1.

In the 2002 Monitoring the Future study, 4% of students surveyed indicated Oxycodone use by 12th grade2. With secondary school enrollment of an estimated 13, 400,000 students, 4% represents more than 535,000 students admitting to Oxycodone use.

Oxycodone specific mentions in hospital Emergency Departments rose 59% to 7,828 in the first half of 20023.

While some commercially available morphine/opiate immunoassays exhibit some degree of cross-reactivity to oxycodone, most do so at such high levels that they are not amenable to detecting the drug in routine use.  Likewise, most confirmation laboratories do not include oxycodone in the standard confirmation procedure for opiates. As such, development of a rapid immunoassay for the specific detection of oxycodone will enable the test administrator to know whether the person might be positive for that drug and request the oxycodone-specific confirmation at the laboratory.  In addition, it will be critically important that the oxycodone assay not routinely cross-react with morphine, codeine or their respective conjugates.

1 OxyContin® Diversion and Abuse, U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) publication.

http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drugs_concern/oxycodone/oxy_061102.pdf

2 Johnston, L.D., O’Malley, C. M., & Bachman, J. G. (2003). Monitoring the Future national results of adolescent drug use; overview of key findings for 2002. (NIH publication 03-5374). Bethesda, MD. National Institute on Drug Abuse.

3 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. Emergency Department Trends From the Drug Abuse Warning Network, Preliminary Estimates January-June 2002, DAWN Series: D-22, DHHS Publication No. (SMA) 03-3779, Rockville, MD, 2002.

 

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OxyContin Information, Use, Testing and Treatment

OxyContin is the brand name for an opioid analgesic containing the active ingredient oxycodone. OxyContin is a legal narcotic that is available, by prescription, to treat severe pain. It is classified as a Schedule II drug, meaning it has a high potential for drug addiction and is only available by prescription from a licensed physician. OxyContin most commonly exists in tablet form. These round pills come in 10mg, 20mg, 40mg, 80mg and 160mg dosages. OxyContin also comes in capsule or liquid form.

 

Q.) What is OxyContin?

A.) OxyContin, approved by the FDA in 1995, is an opium derivative that contains the same active ingredient as Percodan and Percocet. OxyContin is intended for use by terminal cancer patients and chronic pain sufferers. The structural formula for oxycodone hydrochloride is as follows: The chemical formula is 4, 5-epoxy-14-hydroxy-3-methoxy-17-methylmorphinan-6-one hydrochloride. OxyContin is designed so that the oxycodone is slowly released over time.

Oxycodone is a white, odorless, crystalline powder derived from the opium alkaloid. Oxycodone hydrochloride dissolves in water (1 g in 6 to 7 mL). It is slightly soluble in alcohol (octanol water partition coefficient 0.7). The tablets contain the following inactive ingredients: ammonio methacrylate copolymer, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, lactose, magnesium stearate, povidone, red iron oxide (20 mg strength tablet only), stearyl alcohol, talc, titanium dioxide, triacetin, yellow iron oxide (40 mg strength tablet only), and other ingredients.


Q.) What are the various strengths of OxyContin?

A.) OxyContin (oxycodone hydrochloride controlled-release) tablets are an opioid analgesic supplied in 10 mg, 20 mg, 40 mg, and 80 mg tablet strengths for oral administration. The tablet strengths describe the amount of oxycodone per tablet as the hydrochloride salt.

Of the various strengths of OxyContin, the most commonly abused and diverted strength is the 40 mg tablets, although all strengths (10 mg, 20 mg, 40 mg, 80 mg, and 160 mg.) have been encountered.


Q.) What are the slang terms used for OxyContin?

A.) Below is a list of common slang terms used for OxyContin:

  • 40 = OxyContin pill
  • 40 = OxyContin pill
  • 80 = OxyContin pill
  • Doctor shopping = The practice of going from doctor to doctor to obtain prescriptions for pharmaceuticals
  • Hillbilly heroin = OxyContin
  • Kicker = OxyContin
  • Oxy = OxyContin
  • Oxycotton = OxyContin
  • Pharming = Consuming a mixture of prescription substances
  • Pill ladies = Female senior citizens who sell OxyContin

Q.) How does OxyContin work?

A.) OxyContin is an opiate agonist. Opiate agonists provide pain relief by acting on opioid receptors in the spinal cord, brain, and possibly in the tissues directly. Opioids, natural or synthetic classes of drugs that act like morphine, are the most effective pain relievers available. OxyContin is manufactured by modifying an alkaloid found in opium. OxyContin is a central nervous system depressant. OxyContin's action appears to work through stimulating the opioid receptors found in the central nervous system that activate responses ranging from analgesia to respiratory depression and euphoria.


Q.) How is OxyContin used?

A.) When used properly, OxyContin contains a time-release mechanism that spreads the release of the drug over a 12-hour period. The time-release mechanism can be circumvented by crushing the tablet and the drug can be used in one of the following ways:

  1. The tablets can be chewed
  2. The tablets can be crushed, then snorted like cocaine
  3. The tablets can be crushed, dissolved in water, then injected like heroin

Q.) Why would someone abuse OxyContin?

A.) OxyContin abuse is spreading for a variety of reasons. First, the elevated opiate dosage makes it highly addictive. Second, in contrast to drugs such as cocaine or heroin that can be laced with other substances, with OxyContin you know how much of the drug you are getting. Since the dosage is consistent, it delivers a dependable high. Finally, OxyContin is covered by most health insurance plans, so it is significantly cheaper than street drugs.

OxyContin Abuse is becoming a wide spread problem in America. OxyContin is a leading treatment for chronic pain, but officials fear it may succeed crack cocaine on the street. The DEA says it is only a matter of time before every community in the country is confronted with the problem of OxyContin abuse. No prescription drug in the last 20 years has been so widely abused after its release, federal officials say.


Q.) What are the effects of OxyContin?

A.) OxyContin will give you a high much like high grade heroin but with worse consequences. A 5mg tablet of OxyContin has has as many active ingredients as 1 Percocet. So, chewing or snorting a 40mg tablet of OxyContin is similar to taking 8 Percocets at once. An 80mg tablet of OxyContin is like taking 16 Percocets all at once.

Users of OxyContin might experience:

  • euphoria
  • relaxation
  • calm
  • stoned / high

Q.) What are the side effects of OxyContin?

A.) Respiratory depression is the chief hazard of OxyContin. Respiratory depression occurs most frequently in elderly or debilitated patients, usually following large initial doses in non-tolerant patients. There is also a big risk when OxyContin is given in conjunction with other substances that depress respiration. Common OxyContin side effects are constipation, nausea, sedation, dizziness, vomiting, headache, dry mouth, sweating, and weakness.

The side effects of OxyContin include but are not limited to:

  • Gastrointestinal Tract and Other Smooth Muscle
    Oxycodone causes a reduction in motility associated with an increase in smooth muscle tone in the antrum of the stomach and duodenum. Digestion of food in the small intestine is delayed and propulsive contractions are decreased. Propulsive peristaltic waves in the colon are decreased, while tone may be increased to the point of spasm resulting in constipation. Other opioid-induced effects may include a reduction in gastric, biliary and pancreatic secretions, spasm of sphincter of Oddi, and transient elevations in serum amylase.
  • Cardiovascular System
    Oxycodone may produce release of histamine with or without associated peripheral vasodilation. Manifestations of histamine release and/or peripheral vasodilation may include pruritus, flushing, red eyes, sweating, and/or orthostatic hypotension.
  • Concentration--Efficacy Relationships (Pharmacodynamics)
    Studies in normal volunteers and patients reveal predictable relationships between oxycodone dosage and plasma oxycodone concentrations, as well as between concentration and certain expected opioid effects. In normal volunteers these include pupillary constriction, sedation and overall "drug effect" and in patients, analgesia and feelings of "relaxation." In non-tolerant patients, analgesia is not usually seen at a plasma oxycodone concentration of less than 5&10 mg/mL.

Q.) What is OxyContin addiction?

A.) Physical addiction to OxyContin which is sometimes unavoidable, develops when an individual is exposed to OxyContin at a high enough dose for an extended period of time. The user's body adapts and develops a tolerance for the OxyContin. This means that higher doses are needed to achieve the drug's original effects. OxyContin mimics the action of chemicals in your brain that send messages of pleasure to your brain's reward center. It produces an artificial feeling of pleasure. OxyContin is able to produce pleasurable effects by acting like normal brain messenger chemicals, which produce positive feelings in response to signals from the brain.

The result is of the predictable drug which, short circuits interests in and the motivation to make life's normal rewards work. More and more confidence is placed in OxyContin while other survival feelings are ignored and bypassed. The result of this addiction cycle is a lack of concern for, and confidence in, other areas of life.

Signs of OxyContin Addiction

There are many physical and emotional signs of OxyContin addiction.  OxyContin addiction will leave the user suffering physically painful symptoms if their bodies do not get more OxyContin. Signs of OxyContin addiction can include insomnia, muscle and bone pain, sweats, diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, stomach cramping, muscle twitching, as well as other physical effects. The increase in OxyContin addictions has resulted in criminal acts to steal OxyContin. Now, OxyContin labeling changes are being made in hopes of reducing the risk of over prescribing OxyContin and as a result, reducing OxyContin addiction.

When patients are in extreme pain and take OxyContin as directed, or to the point where their pain is adequately controlled, it is not abuse or addiction. Abuse occurs when patients take more than is needed for pain control, especially if they take it to get high. Patients who take their medication in a manner that grossly differs from a physician’s directions are probably abusing that drug.

If a patient continues to seek excessive pain medication after pain management is achieved, the patient may be addicted. OxyContin addiction is characterized by the repeated, compulsive use of a substance despite adverse social, psychological, and/or physical consequences.

OxyContin drug is crushed and then ingested, snorted, or diluted in water and injected. Crushing or diluting the tablet disarms the timed-release action of OxyContin to cause a quick and powerful heroin-like high. Some areas in the country have replaced the use of heroin with the drug OxyContin.

OxyContin’s manufacturer, Purdue Pharma, has taken steps to reduce the potential for abuse of the medication. An alternative to OxyContin without the addictive traits is being studied, but if another medicine is created it will not be available for a significant amount of time. Until then, Purdue Pharma has been trying to develop ways of preventing more instances of abuse and addiction to OxyContin.

Home Drug Tests

 

Signs of OxyContin addiction included but are not limited to:

  • Slow breathing (less than ten breaths a minute is really serious trouble)
  • Small, pinpoint pupils
  • Confusion
  • Being tired, nodding off, or passing out
  • Dizziness
  • Weakness
  • Apathy (they don’t care about anything)
  • Cold and clammy skin
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Seizures

A lot of these signs of OxyContin addiction can make people think their friend is drunk. And they may be tempted to let them sleep it off, or tell their parents they had too much to drink. But don’t. The friend could go to sleep and never wake up.


Q.) What are the symptoms of OxyContin withdrawal?

A.) OxyContin withdrawal is similar heroin withdrawal in that it is almost impossible to go through alone. Withdrawal symptoms of OxyContin are worse than heroin and last longer. Professional help from a drug rehab center is the best and safest way to do this. Unfortunately, there is no known "painless" method for OxyContin withdrawal.

OxyContin withdrawal symptoms include but are not limited to:

  • perpetually being tired
  • hot/cold sweats
  • heart palpitations
  • joints and muscles in constant pain
  • vomiting
  • nausea
  • uncontrollable coughing
  • diarrhea
  • insomnia
  • watery eyes
  • excessive yawning
  • depression

Q.) What are the symptoms of an OxyContin overdose?

A.) OxyContin is designed so that the oxycodone is slowly released over time, allowing it to be used twice daily. You should never break, chew, or crush the OxyContin tablet since this causes a large amount of oxycodone to be released from the tablet all at once. This could potentially result in a dangerous or fatal OxyContin overdose.

An overdose of OxyContin is serious and may require hospitalization. Occasionally, the individual needs to be temporarily hooked to a ventilator to help him breath until the OxyContin wears off.

Indications of an OxyContin overdose are:

  • slow breathing (respiratory depression)
  • seizures
  • dizziness
  • weakness
  • loss of consciousness
  • coma
  • confusion
  • tiredness
  • cold and clammy skin
  • small pupils
  • reduced vision
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • clouding of mental functions

Q.) How is OxyContin detox accomplished?

A.) OxyContin detox is accomplished similarly to other drug detoxification. The individual is stepped down slowly off their dose of OxyContin until they no longer physically need to take it. Without this process, the withdrawal symptoms from OxyContin may be so severe that OxyContin detox may seem impossible to the individual.

OxyContin detox not only helps in easing the withdrawal symptoms experienced by the individual, but it also helps in the path of OxyContin addiction recovery. Detox from OxyContin is invaluable to recovery because it helps in diminishing cravings for OxyContin as well as ridding the body of harmful toxins deposited during OxyContin use.


Q.) What steps are currently being taken to address the widespread abuse of OxyContin?

A.) DEA’s approach to dealing with the abuse and diversion of OxyContin® is consistent with the methods normally used in combating the diversion of pharmaceutical controlled substances. These approaches include; liaison with the heathcare community, the pharmaceutical industry, and other domestic and international agencies; education of medical professionals regarding various scams that are used to obtain controlled substances for illicit purposes; and the investigation of suspected diverters.


Q.) What are some fast facts about OxyContin?

A.)

  • OxyContin, approved by the FDA in 1995, is a time-released form of oxycodone, an opium derivative, which is the same active ingredient in Percodan and Percocet.
  • The powerful prescription pain reliever has become a hot new street drug that has resulted in more than 120 deaths nationwide.
  • Addiction and abuse of the drug, crime, and fatal overdoses have all been reported as a result of OxyContin use.
  • OxyContin is intended for use by terminal cancer patients and chronic pain sufferers.
  • It has been reported that OxyContin sales exceeded $1 billion in the United States in the year 2000.

Q.) What is the history of OxyContin?

A.) Oxycodone, the active ingredient in OxyContin®, is a semi-synthetic opiate derived from thebaine, an element of morphine. Oxycodone has been in medical use for moderate to severe pain for many years, under a variety of brand names. Two drawbacks of the previously available brands are; they are available only in low dosages, so some patients must take many pills a day to get relief; they are found in combination with other drugs, like acetaminophen or aspirin, which can cause dangerous side effects when taken in large quantities.

OxyContin® went on the market in 1996. For patients with serious, ongoing pain, the drug is highly preferable to previous brands because it avoids their two drawbacks. OxyContin® contains no other active ingredients which can cause side effects. It comes in larger dosages with a special timed-release coating, so patients may take only two pills a day.

Legal sales of OxyContin® in 1996 reportedly totaled about $40 million. By 2000, sales were greater than $1 billion, making it the number one narcotic pain relief pill. Most of the pills sold are believed to have been used by legitimate patients.

In May 2001 OxyContin®’s manufacturer voluntarily stopped selling their 160 milligram pill. The dosage in these pills, if taken all at once, could kill a first-time user. Critics of the company feared that this move would not have much of an effect, as the 160 mg pills only made up about 1% of the total amount of OxyContin® available.

Purdue Pharma announced in early August 2001 that they are working on a new formulation of the drug that would make it harder to abuse. Such a formulation could take three years or more to come to market, however.

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Oxycodone Drug Test Product Overview

Oxycodone, active ingredient in the pharmaceutical brands Oxycontin®, Percodan® and Percocet®, is an opiod drug that is chemically derived from the opiate codeine. Although the drug has been in existence for decades, the recent awareness of oxycodone as an abused drug and it’s implication in fatal overdoses warrants an immediate need for an accurate, rapid drug screen specifically designed to detect oxycodone. Some relevant statistics include the following:

As of 2001, with sales nearing $1.5 billion, OxyContin® ranked #1 in retail sales of branded controlled pharmaceuticals1.

In the 2002 Monitoring the Future study, 4% of students surveyed indicated Oxycodone use by 12th grade2. With secondary school enrollment of an estimated 13, 400,000 students, 4% represents more than 535,000 students admitting to Oxycodone use.

Oxycodone specific mentions in hospital Emergency Departments rose 59% to 7,828 in the first half of 20023.

While some commercially available morphine/opiate immunoassays exhibit some degree of cross-reactivity to oxycodone, most do so at such high levels that they are not amenable to detecting the drug in routine use.  Likewise, most confirmation laboratories do not include oxycodone in the standard confirmation procedure for opiates. As such, development of a rapid immunoassay for the specific detection of oxycodone will enable the test administrator to know whether the person might be positive for that drug and request the oxycodone-specific confirmation at the laboratory.  In addition, it will be critically important that the oxycodone assay not routinely cross-react with morphine, codeine or their respective conjugates.

1 OxyContin® Diversion and Abuse, U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) publication.

http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drugs_concern/oxycodone/oxy_061102.pdf

2 Johnston, L.D., O’Malley, C. M., & Bachman, J. G. (2003). Monitoring the Future national results of adolescent drug use; overview of key findings for 2002. (NIH publication 03-5374). Bethesda, MD. National Institute on Drug Abuse.

3 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. Emergency Department Trends From the Drug Abuse Warning Network, Preliminary Estimates January-June 2002, DAWN Series: D-22, DHHS Publication No. (SMA) 03-3779, Rockville, MD, 2002.

 

One Step Oxycodone Test Device

A rapid, one step test for the qualitative detection of oxycodone in human urine.
For healthcare professionals including professionals at point of care sites
For in vitro diagnostic use only.

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The OXYCODONE One Step Oxycodone Test Device is a rapid chromatographic immunoassay for the qualitative detection of oxycodone in human urine at a cut-off concentration of 100 ng/mL.

This assay provides only a preliminary analytical test result. A more specific alternate chemical method must be used in order to obtain a confirmed analytical result. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) is the preferred confirmatory method. Clinical consideration and professional judgment should be applied to any drug of abuse test result, particularly when preliminary positive results are used.

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Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic opioid with a structural similarity to codeine.  The drug is manufactured by modifying thebaine, an alkaloid found in the opium poppy. Oxycodone, like all opiate agonists, provides pain relief by acting on opioid receptors in the spinal cord, brain, and possibly directly in the affected tissues. Oxycodone is prescribed for the relief of moderate to high pain under the well-known pharmaceutical trade names of OxyContin®, Tylox®, Percodan® and Percocet®. While Tylox, Percodan and Percocet contain only small doses of oxycodone hydrochloride combined with other analgesics such as acetaminophen or aspirin, OxyContin consists solely of oxycodone hydrochloride in a time-release form. Oxycodone is known to metabolize by demethylation into oxymorphone and noroxycodone. In a 24-hour urine, 33-61% of a single, 5mg oral dose is excreted with the primary constituents being unchanged drug (13-19%), conjugated drug (7­29%) and conjugated oxymorphone (13-14%)1. The window of detection for oxycodone in urine is expected to be similar to that of other opioids such as morphine. The OXYCODONE One Step Oxycodone Test Device yields a positive result when the oxycodone level in urine exceeds 100 ng/mL.  At present, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) does not have a recommended screening cutoff for oxycodone positive specimens.

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The OXYCODONE One Step Oxycodone Test Device is an immunoassay based on the principle of competitive binding. Drugs which may be present in the urine specimen compete against the drug conjugate for binding sites on the antibody.  During testing, a urine specimen migrates upward by capillary action. Oxycodone, if present in the urine specimen below 100 ng/mL, will not saturate the binding sites of antibody in the test device. The antibody coated particles will then be captured by immobilized Oxycodone conjugate and a visible colored line will appear in the test line region. The colored line will not form in the test line region if the Oxycodone level exceeds 100 ng/mL because it will saturate all the binding sites of anti-Oxycodone antibody. A drug-positive urine specimen will not generate a colored line in the test line region because of drug competition, while a drug-negative urine specimen or a specimen containing a drug concentration less than the cut-off will generate a line in the test line region. To serve as a procedural control, a colored line will always appear at the control line region, indicating that proper volume of specimen has been added and membrane wicking has occurred.

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The test device contains monoclonal anti-Oxycodone antibody-coupled particles and Oxycodone-protein conjugate. A goat antibody is employed in the control line.

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·          For healthcare professionals including professionals at point of care sites.

·          For in vitro diagnostic use only. Do not use after the expiration date.

·          The test device should remain in the sealed pouch until ready for use. 

·          All specimens should be considered potentially hazardous and handled in the same manner as an infectious agent.

·          Used test device should be discarded according to federal, state and local regulations.

 

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Store as packaged in the sealed pouch at 2-30°C. The test device is stable through the expiration date printed on the sealed pouch. The test device must remain in the sealed pouch until use. DO NOT FREEZE. Do not use beyond the expiration date.

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Urine Assay The urine specimen must be collected in a clean and dry container. Urine collected at any time of the day may be used. Urine specimens exhibiting visible precipitates should be centrifuged, filtered, or allowed to settle to obtain clear specimen for testing.

Specimen Storage

Urine specimens may be stored at 2-8°C for up to 48 hours prior to testing. For prolonged storage, specimens may be frozen and stored below -20°C. Frozen specimens should be thawed and mixed before testing.

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·          Test devices

·          Disposable specimen droppers

·          Package insert

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·          Specimen collection container

·          Timer

·          External controls

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Allow test device, urine specimen, and/or controls to equilibrate to room temperature (15-30°C) prior to testing.

1.                   Bring the pouch to room temperature before opening it. Remove the test device from the sealed pouch and use it as soon as possible.

2.                   Place the test device on a clean and level surface. Hold the dropper vertically and transfer 3 full drops of urine (approx. 100µl) to the specimen well (S) of the test device, and then start the timer. Avoid trapping air bubbles in the specimen well (S). Refer to illustration.

3.                   Wait for the red line(s) to appear. The result should be read at 5 minutes. Results may be stable up to 4 hours after test initiation.

                       

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(Please refer to illustration above)

NEGATIVE:* Two lines appear. One red line should be in the control region (C), and another apparent red or pink line should be in the test region (T). This negative result indicates that the Oxycodone concentration is below the detectable level (100 ng/mL).

* NOTE: The shade of red in the test region (T) may vary, but it should be considered negative whenever there is even a faint pink line.

POSITIVE: One red line appears in the control region (C). No line appears in the test region. This positive result indicates that the Oxycodone concentration is above the detectable level (100 ng/mL).

INVALID: Control line fails to appear. Insufficient specimen volume or incorrect procedural techniques are the most likely reasons for control line failure. Review the procedure and repeat the test using a new test device. If the problem persists, discontinue using the lot immediately and contact your local distributor.

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A procedural control is included in the test. A red line appearing in the control region (C) is considered as an internal procedural control. It confirms sufficient specimen volume, adequate membrane wicking and correct procedural technique. 

Control standards are not supplied with this kit; however, it is recommended that positive and negative controls be tested as a good laboratory practice to confirm the test procedure and to verify proper test performance.  Users should follow local, state, and federal guidelines for testing QC materials.

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1. The OXYCODONE One Step Oxycodone Test Device provides only a qualitative, preliminary analytical result. A secondary analytical method must be used to obtain a confirmed result. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) are the preferred confirmatory methods.1,2

2. It is possible that technical or procedural errors, as well as other interfering substances in the urine specimen may cause erroneous results.

3.  Adulterants, such as bleach and/or alum, in urine specimens may produce erroneous results regardless of the analytical method used. If adulteration is suspected, the test should be repeated with another urine specimen.

4. A Positive Result does not indicate level or intoxication, administration route or concentration in urine.

5. A Negative Result may not necessarily indicate drug-free urine.  Negative results can be obtained when drug is present but below the cutoff level of the test.

6. Test does not distinguish between drugs of abuse and certain medications.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON OTHER DRUGS OF ABUSE, SEE THE INFORMATION BELOW.

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